Friday, May 22, 2020

Education for Homeless Students Essay example - 1899 Words

Homeless families with children represent the fastest growing segment of the homeless population; in fact, they constitute about 40 percent of all people who are homeless (Stronge 7). In addition, the most recent estimate of homeless children and youngsters by the United States Department of Education is 744,000 (Stronge 7). These statistics are indeed quite frightening, and they go to show that children constitute a large part of the homeless dilemma. The part of that dilemma that seems most taxing is that of educating such homeless children. How can these kids become active members of society if they are unable to receive a proper public education, the same education that is provided for so many other kids under the Constitution?†¦show more content†¦While at my on-site orientation for tutoring at the Center for the Homeless in downtown South Bend, the volunteer coordinator made a point of bringing up the center’s Montessori preschool program. It is very unique, and she was very proud of it. She then went on to explain why the program is so important. She said that the younger kids have the greatest chance of changing their ways. The earlier they start turning their lives around, the better the chance that they will break old harmful habits and start making new helpful ones. In Judy Daniels’ article entitled Humanistic Interventions for Homeless Students: Identifying and Reducing Barriers to Their Personal Development, the author is successful in describing real-life examples of the effects of homelessness on school-aged children. She starts out with the story of Angie, a high school student who lives in a tent with her mother and two siblings. After being caught for fighting with her classmates, Angie is sent to the counselor’s office where she confesses her frustration with her current living situation. Living in a place I shouldn’t is ruining my life! How would you like to take cold showers every day in a public bathroom? We cannot even go to the bathroom by ourselves because it’s not safe. One thing that really bothers me is that I do not have any time for myself andShow MoreRelatedCurrent Housing Policies For Homeless Youth1281 Words   |  6 PagesAccording to the 2014 Department of Housing and Urban Development statistics, 34% of the total homeless population of America are under 24 years old (HUD 2014). Although HUD recognizes that this is an alarming number, current housing laws offer little protection for homeless youth. Young people in America face homelessness due to financial issues, lack of family support or insufficient housing. Many of these homeless youth are on their own and are enrolled in college and since the recession of 2008 theirRead MoreMckinney Vento Act : Case Study863 Words   |  4 PagesFunding McKinney Vento Act provides federal funding to states to meet the needs of homeless students. States are given the flexibility to spend the funds appropriately. This includes the fixed amendment where schools can spend money on direct education services including various programs. LAUSD would continue to use these federal funds to hire homeless liaisons as part of their Homeless Education Program. The Local Control Funding Formula (LCFF) was passed in California and gives school districtsRead More Homelessness in Public Schools998 Words   |  4 Pageseffective, serve the students, and have the best outcome. Well known problems such as bullying, special educational needs, budget cuts, new standards, and job cuts. Some of the problems are well known to the public while other problems are left in the background. According to the National Association for the Education of Homeless Children and Youth (NAEHCY) reported that the U.S. Department of Education collected data stating â€Å"du ring the 2008-2009 school year that 954,914 homeless children and youthRead MoreEssay on Poverty in Gwinnett County, Georgia1120 Words   |  5 Pagesrecognize children of poverty and how to help those students, and what rights those children have to an education. Poverty and Childrens Education In Gwinnett county the average homeless person is 6 years old (Family Promise of Gwinnett County, 2013). As an educator, this is worrisome because these children in poverty will encounter many difficulties relating to their education. What difficulties are these children facing with and their education? According to Donald Hernandez (Hernandez, 2011)Read MoreWhy Do Students Experiencing Homelessness?1205 Words   |  5 PagesIn fact, â€Å"these liaisons are responsible for advocating for students experiencing homelessness by actively searching for children to enroll, creating awareness about educational rights, and working with agencies that serve the homeless to promote educational stability and opportunity. (Wilkins, Mullins, Mahan, Canfield, 2016) As a result, there have been important improvements that have been seen in the MVA, these are considered residency requirements, record transfer delays, and having a lackRead MoreHomeless Is No One Fault1741 Words   |  7 Page s Being homeless is no one fault. Someone may be unable to have a shelter, however someone should be eligible to gain a education even if they do not have funds to pay the amount of college. I believe it’s college student who are suffering from being homeless and not having no where to stay. Recently, I heard a story that a student that was homeless girl asked one of her professors for supplies and a book bag because she can’t afford anything and she s homeless. A person that is destitute does notRead MoreArgumentative Essay On Homelessness1485 Words   |  6 Pagesshould increase funding for the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act. Increased funding would decrease homelessness by lowering the crime rate, educating students, and improving American living conditions. As the number of homeless Americans increased during the 1980’s, the American government was forced respond to the growing issue. Being the first federal response for homelessness, Congress appropriated $140 million to the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act (Katel). The McKinney-Vento ActRead MoreNew York Department Of Education1275 Words   |  6 PagesThe New York Department of Education is debating re-zoning some of Manhattan’s schools in order to diversify the student bodies. Of all of the proposed integrations, the re-zoning of Public School (PS) 199 and PS 191 has led to the most persistent parent protests. On the one hand, this change would lead to a more diverse student body, reduce overcrowding at PS 199, and break down the walls of racial, political, and socio-economic division. On the other hand, it would potentially cause disruptiveRead MoreOutline Of Policy Development Process Outline1058 Words   |  5 Pagesof the upbringing of students. Students, teachers, parents, and staff initiate and reinforce a culture of achievement and encouragement with a range of formal rewards and consequences for behavior and academic performance. Person Responsible for Policy Development: Administrator / Principal Process for Developing Policy: Rough draft written by the principal that will then be reviewed by a committee made up of principal, teachers (1 representing each grade level), students, and parents (voted byRead MoreHomelessness : America s Resources For The Homeless Are Scarce1452 Words   |  6 PagesResources for the Homeless are Scarce in America Justin Hooks Fayetteville State University 2/27/2015 Abstract In this study, I will take the time out and investigate the effects that every day citizens have on homeless citizens and how we can play a big role in helping homelessness decrease. Over the past years many citizens haven’t established safe and stable places to live. I will then elaborate on how you can be sheltered and unsheltered and still be considered homeless. My main objective

Saturday, May 9, 2020

Gender and Emotions - 2537 Words

American culture assumes a great difference in the way men and women experience emotions. Women are assumed to be far more emotional than men, both in experiencing the emotions internally, as well as expressing them to the outside world. While the genders may differ in how they express their emotions, men and women do not inherently differ in the frequency of emotionality. Men are not emotionless, and women do not overcompensate for mens lack of emotion. The roots of our ideas about gender and emotion date far back. According to Simon and Nath, Historians have documented that Americans beliefs about womens emotionality and mens unemotionality (or emotional reserve) are rooted in the 19th century gender ideologies, which were used to†¦show more content†¦Each pair, or each individual in private, was exposed to one low-agency and one high-agency emotion ad. Those in pairs were asked not to express their feelings toward the ad until after they had handed in their questionnaire involving their reactions to each ad. The questionnaire asked participants to answer the questions pertaining to viewing pleasure, their attitude to the ad, covarities, as well as confound checks to establish that the ads were clear and understandable to all participants. Results found from this first study that males reported less viewing pleasure in public than in private settings. However, they found that males responses to the ad in public was only influenced when viewing low-agency ads with another male, not with a female. Their responses to high-agency ads were not affected by the presence of either gender. There was no such condition found for females, whose viewing pleasure was consistent in all social settings. In private settings, males viewing pleasure was not any different from the females responses. When not feeling as though they are under social pressure to suppress emotion, males were as emotional as females. A second study was conducted which mimicked the first, but simply controlled for any social interaction which may have taken place in the booths in the first study.Show MoreRelatedEmotions Through Culture And Gender1261 Words   |  6 Pages Expressing Emotions Through Culture and Gender Have you ever thought about the way you express your emotions? Emotions are a significant part of our lives. They enable us to express our feelings to those around us. How we express our emotion is determined by a mixture of culture and family influences that directs our gender to express emotions differently. People are more likely to experience emotions versus being able to express them. They way we express our emotions changes over timeRead MoreEssay on Gender Differences and Emotions1687 Words   |  7 Pagesthis complicated situation and find the humor and harmony I have achieved. The gender differences we often experience is not caused by the fact that men and women live in different realities, but the difficulties are formed by a lack of understanding and mutual experiences shared by each gender. Despite the numerous efforts to understand completely the differences between the male and female gender, there is no concrete answer. Acceptance of each other without trying to change the otherRead MoreGender Roles And Stereotypes Of Emotions1149 Words   |  5 PagesGender Roles and Stereotypes of Emotions Growing up, people are put into roles based on their gender. Gender roles are, â€Å"the behaviors, attitudes, and personality traits that are designated as either masculine or feminine† (Hockenbury Hockenbury, 2014, p. 409). Along with gender-roles are stereotypes. Stereotypes are a widely held belief about a group of people based on their race, religion, social class, or gender. Gender-role stereotypes are, â€Å"The beliefs and expectations people hold about theRead MoreCultural And Gender Differences Of Emotion1179 Words   |  5 PagesCultural and Gender Differences in Emotion Emotion â€Å"Emotions are the cornerstones of our social worlds, affecting our interactions with others in countless ways† (Soto, Levenson, and Ebling, 2005). The domain of emotion is vast with many aspects to investigate and discover. Research suggests that there are basic emotions of anger, disgust, fear, happiness, sadness, and surprise and also more complex emotions such as contempt, embarrassment, pride, and shame (Tracy Robins, 2008). Two areas ofRead MoreGender Differences Of Emotion And Communication Essay1374 Words   |  6 PagesGender Differences in Emotion and Communication By Nina Bingham | Submitted On April 11, 2011 Recommend Article Article Comments Print Article Share this article on Facebook Share this article on Twitter Share this article on Google+ Share this article on Linkedin Share this article on StumbleUpon Share this article on Delicious 1 Share this article on Digg Share this article on Reddit Share this article on Pinterest Expert Author Nina Bingham Society expects women to be more emotionallyRead MoreThe Role Of Gender, Individual Trait, And Emotion1036 Words   |  5 PagesThe role of gender, individual trait, and emotion in response to advertisements using violent vs. non-violent images and messages to promote mediated MMA consumption. Sang Yoon Ryu Introduction Over the past few decades, Mixed Martial Arts (MMA) industry has dramatically increased (Kim et al, 2008; Lim et al., 2010; Damon et al, 2009; Andrew et al, 2009; Kwak, McDaniel, 2013). The sport exceeded boxing and wrestling as the preferred combat sport among young people (Lafayette Hibbered, 2006)Read MoreGender Asymmetry, Emotion Work and Its Role in Gender Power Relations1242 Words   |  5 PagesGender Asymmetry, Emotion Work and Its Role in Gender Power Relations In this essay the following topics will be discussed, gender asymmetry, emotion work and what role this plays in gender power relations in the context of heterosexual couples. Duncombe and Marsden in 1993 use local survey evidence to illustrate the gender difference or asymmetry in intimate emotional behaviour. It is a commonly known belief that in the first stages of a relationship, it is passionateRead MoreInterview : Gender Roles, Occupational Role And Emotions1441 Words   |  6 PagesDeante Metts Sociology 468 Fall 2015 Dr. Dosik Interview - Gender Roles, Occupational Role and Emotions Sociologist Arlie Hochschild, author of The Managed Heart argues that modern societies demand emotional labor, particularly in the service sector, where she described it as, †management of feeling to create a publicly observable facial and bodily display †¦ sold for a wage.† This term can apply to a variety of professions, but it is most often used to reference to the sort of attitude managementRead More The Effect one’s Gender and Personality has on their Ability to Identify the Emotion and Gender of a Face.1925 Words   |  8 Pagesinvestigation aimed to explore gender differences and personality differences in the ability to identify the emotion and gender of a face. The expected results were that the response times produced by females for facial emotion and gender identification would be faster than the response times produced my males. It was also expected that participants categorised as extroverts via the Necker cube would produce faster response times when identifying the emotion and gender of a face. Although the resultsRead MoreGender Differences On Negative Emotions During The Childhood And Adolescence Stages Essay1343 Words   |  6 Pagesgentle emotions, and males show more aggressive emotions. â€Å"Sayings such as ‘boys don’t cry’ and ‘sugar and spice and everything nice—that’s what little girls are made of’ reflect cultural beliefs and expectations that girls show cheeriness or sadness, whereas boys are strong and calm, showing anger if necessary† (Chaplin Aldao, 2013). Before this study, there were only empirical reviews of happiness expression. There has been no empirical review of gender differences on negative emotions during

Wednesday, May 6, 2020

Task 1 Eymp 1 Free Essays

Context and principles for early years provisions. The Early Years Foundation Stage was brought into force in September 2008 by orders and regulations which come under section 39 of the Childcare Act 2006. All of the early years providers are required to use the EYFS to ensure a flexible approach to children’s care, learning and development that enables young children to achieve the five Every Child Matters (ECM) outcomes. We will write a custom essay sample on Task 1 Eymp 1 or any similar topic only for you Order Now These 5 outcomes are staying safe, being healthy, enjoying and achieving, making a positive contribution and achieving economic wellbeing. The EYFS is used in many different settings and some of these are schools, nurseries, pre-schools, playgroups, after school clubs, breakfast clubs and child minders. This statutory framework sets out legal requirements to relate to the learning and development of children and the legal requirements relating to welfare. There are early learning goals which are the educational programmes and the assessment arrangements. The welfare requirements are given legal force by regulations made under section 39 of the Childcare Act 2006. Together the order, the regulations and the statutory framework documents make up the legal basis of the EYFS. Each individual child is supported by the EYFS because it is there to support the needs and interests of each individual child. There are six areas covered by the early learning goals and educational programmes. They are equally important and depend on each other to support the rounded approach to child development. All these areas much be delivered through planned, purposeful play with a balance of adult-led and child-initiated activities. These six areas are; * Personal, Social and Emotional Development. Communication, Language and Literacy. * Problem-solving, Reasoning and Numeracy. * Knowledge and Understanding of the World. * Physical Development. * Creative Development. * The EYFS has partnerships with parents and from this we know when parents and practitioners in the early years work together it has a direct impact on the children’s development and learning. T he EYFS does observations to look at and listening to children to find out how they are developing, what they like doing and what they are learning through their play and the other experiences they are given. Assessment in the EYFS is of two main types. The first type is  on-going assessment  which is what practitioners do on a daily basis to make decisions about what the child has learned or can do already. This is to help the child move on in their learning. Another type of assessment known as summative assessment takes place twice in the Revised EYFS. Firstly when a child is between 24 and 36 months, the outcomes of this are recorded and parents and practitioners  use the information gained to identify  a child’s strengths and their learning needs. The second assessment takes place  towards the end of the Early Years Foundation Stage. This is to sum up all the different information from on-going assessments that have been made about the child. Planning in the early years is about meeting young children’s needs so that they can play and learn happily in ways which will help them develop skills and knowledge across the   Prime and Specific areas of learning in the EYFS. Development Matters in the Early Years Foundation Stage is non-statutory guidance material which is intended to support practitioners in implementing the statutory requirements of the EYFS. It shows how the four themes of the EYFS and the principles that inform them work together to support babies and children. A progress check is done when the child is two years old which was developed by the National Children’s Bureau. This check covers the legal requirements for the EYFS. It is done to check how the child is progressing. There is also a check done at 5 years old which is when children are starting school. The statutory framework is split into 3 sections which are the introduction, the learning and development requirements and the welfare requirements. The introduction is an overview which explains the aims and legal requirements. The learning and development requirements is the early learning goals and are a statutory requirement for all Ofsted registered providers. The welfare requirements are universal and have to be met by all Ofsted registered settings. There are 4 main themes to the EYFS which are a unique child, positive relationships, enabling environments and learning and development. A unique child theme is there because every child is a unique child who is constantly learning and can be resilient, capable, confident and self-assured. The positive relationships are there so children can learn to be strong and independent through these positive relationships. Enabling environments is a theme because Children learn and develop which gives them experiences which respond to their individual needs and there is a strong partnership between practitioners and parents and carers. Learning and development is a theme as it means children develop and learn in different ways and the framework covers the education and care of all children in early years provision, including children with special educational needs and disabilities. There are many different theorists which have very different approaches on the early years education for children. Some of these theorists are Reggio Emilia, Friedrich Frobel, Rudolf Steiner, Susan Isaacs, Margaret MacMillan and Maria Montessori. I am only going to explain in detail about 3 of these. The 3 I have chosen are Reggio Emilia, Friedrich Frobel and Margaret MacMillan. The Reggio Emilia approach is an early childhood education approach and was started in a town in the Northern end of Italy in 1940’s and is now worldwide. This approach values the potential of all children to think, learn and construct knowledge. This approach gives children the right to be recognised as subjects of individual, legal, civil and social rights. The Reggio Emilia approach offers training materials and courses which are designed to promote this approach throughout Italy and the world. This approach is a progressive child-centred approach to education which believes children must be free to discover and learn for themselves. A teacher which teaches in the Reggio Emilia approach allows children to do many things and supports them in many ways e. . they allow the children to ask their own questions and to explore and generate many possibilities. The teacher provides opportunities for the children to communicate their own ideas to other children. The Friedrich Frobel approach enables children to be cherished, simulated and to flourish their full potential. Friedrich set up education systems in Germany which are still used to t his day. Friedrich Frobel believes all children are like tiny flowers, they are varied, they need care but each child is beautiful alone and glorious when seen in the community of peers. He done this approach for children from birth to 7 years old and it recognises how unique each child is and every child’s different areas of development as a whole. This approach provides an environment which is safe, intellectually challenging, allows free access to a rich range of materials, opportunities for play and which work close in partnership with parents and other skilled adults. The Margaret MacMillan approach emphasis relationships, feelings and ideas in the physical aspect of learning. It also works in close partnership with parents and provides play for children as Margaret believes it helps children apply what they understand. Margaret believes in first-hand experience and active learning so she provides most of her learning through play because she believes this helps the children. She also believes children can’t learn if they are undernourished, poorly clothes, sick or ill, with poor teeth, poor eyesight, ear infections, rickets and so on. Therefore Margaret provides everything possible which is needed to help these things e. g. free school clothes and meals. She will not allow a child which is ill or sick into her environment as she believes they should be at home getting better. How to cite Task 1 Eymp 1, Papers

Task 1 Eymp 1 Free Essays

Context and principles for early years provisions. The Early Years Foundation Stage was brought into force in September 2008 by orders and regulations which come under section 39 of the Childcare Act 2006. All of the early years providers are required to use the EYFS to ensure a flexible approach to children’s care, learning and development that enables young children to achieve the five Every Child Matters (ECM) outcomes. We will write a custom essay sample on Task 1 Eymp 1 or any similar topic only for you Order Now These 5 outcomes are staying safe, being healthy, enjoying and achieving, making a positive contribution and achieving economic wellbeing. The EYFS is used in many different settings and some of these are schools, nurseries, pre-schools, playgroups, after school clubs, breakfast clubs and child minders. This statutory framework sets out legal requirements to relate to the learning and development of children and the legal requirements relating to welfare. There are early learning goals which are the educational programmes and the assessment arrangements. The welfare requirements are given legal force by regulations made under section 39 of the Childcare Act 2006. Together the order, the regulations and the statutory framework documents make up the legal basis of the EYFS. Each individual child is supported by the EYFS because it is there to support the needs and interests of each individual child. There are six areas covered by the early learning goals and educational programmes. They are equally important and depend on each other to support the rounded approach to child development. All these areas much be delivered through planned, purposeful play with a balance of adult-led and child-initiated activities. These six areas are; * Personal, Social and Emotional Development. Communication, Language and Literacy. * Problem-solving, Reasoning and Numeracy. * Knowledge and Understanding of the World. * Physical Development. * Creative Development. * The EYFS has partnerships with parents and from this we know when parents and practitioners in the early years work together it has a direct impact on the children’s development and learning. T he EYFS does observations to look at and listening to children to find out how they are developing, what they like doing and what they are learning through their play and the other experiences they are given. Assessment in the EYFS is of two main types. The first type is  on-going assessment  which is what practitioners do on a daily basis to make decisions about what the child has learned or can do already. This is to help the child move on in their learning. Another type of assessment known as summative assessment takes place twice in the Revised EYFS. Firstly when a child is between 24 and 36 months, the outcomes of this are recorded and parents and practitioners  use the information gained to identify  a child’s strengths and their learning needs. The second assessment takes place  towards the end of the Early Years Foundation Stage. This is to sum up all the different information from on-going assessments that have been made about the child. Planning in the early years is about meeting young children’s needs so that they can play and learn happily in ways which will help them develop skills and knowledge across the   Prime and Specific areas of learning in the EYFS. Development Matters in the Early Years Foundation Stage is non-statutory guidance material which is intended to support practitioners in implementing the statutory requirements of the EYFS. It shows how the four themes of the EYFS and the principles that inform them work together to support babies and children. A progress check is done when the child is two years old which was developed by the National Children’s Bureau. This check covers the legal requirements for the EYFS. It is done to check how the child is progressing. There is also a check done at 5 years old which is when children are starting school. The statutory framework is split into 3 sections which are the introduction, the learning and development requirements and the welfare requirements. The introduction is an overview which explains the aims and legal requirements. The learning and development requirements is the early learning goals and are a statutory requirement for all Ofsted registered providers. The welfare requirements are universal and have to be met by all Ofsted registered settings. There are 4 main themes to the EYFS which are a unique child, positive relationships, enabling environments and learning and development. A unique child theme is there because every child is a unique child who is constantly learning and can be resilient, capable, confident and self-assured. The positive relationships are there so children can learn to be strong and independent through these positive relationships. Enabling environments is a theme because Children learn and develop which gives them experiences which respond to their individual needs and there is a strong partnership between practitioners and parents and carers. Learning and development is a theme as it means children develop and learn in different ways and the framework covers the education and care of all children in early years provision, including children with special educational needs and disabilities. There are many different theorists which have very different approaches on the early years education for children. Some of these theorists are Reggio Emilia, Friedrich Frobel, Rudolf Steiner, Susan Isaacs, Margaret MacMillan and Maria Montessori. I am only going to explain in detail about 3 of these. The 3 I have chosen are Reggio Emilia, Friedrich Frobel and Margaret MacMillan. The Reggio Emilia approach is an early childhood education approach and was started in a town in the Northern end of Italy in 1940’s and is now worldwide. This approach values the potential of all children to think, learn and construct knowledge. This approach gives children the right to be recognised as subjects of individual, legal, civil and social rights. The Reggio Emilia approach offers training materials and courses which are designed to promote this approach throughout Italy and the world. This approach is a progressive child-centred approach to education which believes children must be free to discover and learn for themselves. A teacher which teaches in the Reggio Emilia approach allows children to do many things and supports them in many ways e. . they allow the children to ask their own questions and to explore and generate many possibilities. The teacher provides opportunities for the children to communicate their own ideas to other children. The Friedrich Frobel approach enables children to be cherished, simulated and to flourish their full potential. Friedrich set up education systems in Germany which are still used to t his day. Friedrich Frobel believes all children are like tiny flowers, they are varied, they need care but each child is beautiful alone and glorious when seen in the community of peers. He done this approach for children from birth to 7 years old and it recognises how unique each child is and every child’s different areas of development as a whole. This approach provides an environment which is safe, intellectually challenging, allows free access to a rich range of materials, opportunities for play and which work close in partnership with parents and other skilled adults. The Margaret MacMillan approach emphasis relationships, feelings and ideas in the physical aspect of learning. It also works in close partnership with parents and provides play for children as Margaret believes it helps children apply what they understand. Margaret believes in first-hand experience and active learning so she provides most of her learning through play because she believes this helps the children. She also believes children can’t learn if they are undernourished, poorly clothes, sick or ill, with poor teeth, poor eyesight, ear infections, rickets and so on. Therefore Margaret provides everything possible which is needed to help these things e. g. free school clothes and meals. She will not allow a child which is ill or sick into her environment as she believes they should be at home getting better. How to cite Task 1 Eymp 1, Papers

Tuesday, April 28, 2020

Who am I Ten Years from now Essay Example

Who am I Ten Years from now? Essay Who am I ten years from now? What will I become ten years from now? It took me hours thinking about it, though with the course Im taking right now, it is pretty obvious. No one can predict his/her own future and no one can exactly tell what will be our life 10 years from now. Theres a possibility that you will die or theres a possibility that youll have your own family or whatsoever. I always wanted to see what will be my life in the future. As I reminisced my childhood years, I have many dreams and aspirations that I would like to accomplish. Like to become an actress, model, beauty queen and the like, amazing isnt it? Look how ambitions I am. When I was in high school, those dreams of mine changed. Maybe because thats too impossible to happen with the situation I have. Yes, like any other students here in NORMS, I also belong to a poor family. It was my family who decided what will be my course. I never heard a question from them saying, Nuns mug Ghana nag Kurds day? Kay nonsupport ramie. One time when I intentionally penned up what course I want or like, the conversation always ended up with away nag Kurds nag mammal, kina rang borate. But look I am today, a 3rd year education student who now loves her course. I realized that teaching is really my passion. With the question above, I know that by Gods grace, Ill be an agent of change, a successful educator someday and a wife with 2 or 3 kids. With those thoughts I Just cant stop myself smile. And I know, my family would be very proud of me 10 years or few more years fro m now. We will write a custom essay sample on Who am I Ten Years from now? specifically for you for only $16.38 $13.9/page Order now We will write a custom essay sample on Who am I Ten Years from now? specifically for you FOR ONLY $16.38 $13.9/page Hire Writer We will write a custom essay sample on Who am I Ten Years from now? specifically for you FOR ONLY $16.38 $13.9/page Hire Writer

Friday, March 20, 2020

little freedoms essays

little freedoms essays Freedom is defined by the Merriam-Webster online dictionary as the absence of necessity, coercion, or constraint in choice or action. If there is one group of people in American history who are subjected to more coercion and constraint in choice and action it has to be the black female slave. Slaves in general face constraints on their freedoms by nature of being slaves. Women, on the other hand, have been oppressed into submissive roles throughout human history. These constraints on the freedoms of women are reinforced by laws and customs in many parts of the world, even today. Women do almost all of the worlds domestic work and childcare without pay. In total it is estimated that women work two-thirds of all hours worked, and yet only receive a tenth of the worlds income. With that said it is difficult to imagine what small freedoms, if any, a female slave had so many years ago. Deborah Gray Whites book Arnt I a Woman takes a hard look the issues and horrible conditions the female slave faced in America. Throughout the book White makes it evident that women in American slavery had fewer freedoms than anybody, even male slaves. As White points out early, the female slave was black in a white society, slave in a free society, (and) woman in a society ruled by men. (p.15) Female slaves had less power than any other people in America and more constrains on their personal freedoms than any other group of people. Not only did female slaves suffer all the bondages of being a slave, they suffered for being female at the same time. Slavery was different for women and men. As White is clear to point out, the enslavement was not necessarily worse for female slaves than it was for male slaves, but I think it is clear from the evidence she presents that female slaves were less free than male slaves. (p.89) For instance, women were sexually exploited virtually as soon as they were enslaved. Women wer...

Tuesday, March 3, 2020

The Most Commonly Read Books in High School

The Most Commonly Read Books in High School No matter what type of high school you attend- be it public, private, magnet, charter, religious schools, or even online- reading is going be at the core of your English studies. In todays classrooms, students have a wide range of books to choose from, both modern and classics. If you compare the readings lists in all schools, you might be surprised to learn that the most commonly read books in all high schools are all very similar. Thats right! Course work for private schools and public schools (and every other school) are all very similar. No matter where you go to school, youll likely study classic authors like Shakespeare and Twain, but some more modern books are appearing on these lists, including The Color Purple and  The Giver.   Commonly Read High School Books Here are some of the books that most often appear on high school reading lists: Shakespeares Macbeth is on most schools lists. This play was mostly written when Scottish James I ascended the throne of England, much to many Englishmens chagrin, and it tells the tale of Macbeths fearful regicide and his ensuing guilt. Even students who do not relish Shakespearean English appreciate this lively tale, filled with murder, scary nights in a remote Scottish castle, battles, and a riddle that isnt solved until the end of the play.Shakespeares Romeo and Juliet is also on the list. Familiar to most students because of modern updates, this tale features star-crossed lovers and adolescent impulses that appeal to most high school readers.Shakespeares Hamlet, a story of an angst-ridden prince whose father has been murdered by his uncle, also tops independent schools lists. The soliloquies in this play, including to be or not to be, and what a rogue and peasant slave am I, are known to many high school students.Julius Caesar, another Shakespeare play, is featured on many schoo ls lists. It is one of Shakespeares history plays and is about the assassination of the Roman dictator Julius Caesar in 44 B.C. Mark Twains Huckleberry Finn has been controversial since its release in the United States in 1885. While some critics and school districts have condemned or banned the book because of its perceived vulgar language and apparent racism, it often appears on high school reading lists as a skillful dissection of American racism and regionalism.The Scarlet Letter, written by Nathaniel Hawthorne in 1850, is a tale of adultery and guilt set during Puritan rule of Boston. While many high school students have a difficult time wading through the sometimes dense prose, the surprise conclusion of the novel and its examination of hypocrisy often make it ultimately appealing to this audience.Many high school students enjoy F. Scott Fitzgeralds 1925 The Great Gatsby, a riveting and beautifully written tale of lust, love, greed, and class anxiety in the Roaring Twenties. There are parallels to modern America, and the characters are compelling. Many students read this book in English class while they are studying American history, and the novel provides insight into the moral values of the 1920s. Harper Lees 1960 classic To Kill A Mockingbird, later made into a wonderful movie starring Gregory Peck, is, simply put, one of the best American books ever written. Its tale of injustice written through the eyes of an innocent narrator grabs most readers; it is often read in 7th or 8th grade and sometimes in high school. It tends to be a book students remember for a long time, if not for the rest of their lives.Homers The Odyssey, in any one of its modern translations, proves difficult going for many students, with its poetry and mythological narrative. However, many students grow to enjoy the adventure-filled tribulations of Odysseus and the insight the tale provides into the culture of ancient Greece.William Goldings 1954 novel The Lord of the Flies is often banned because of its essential message that evil lurks in the hearts of man–or in this case, the hearts of boys who are marooned on a deserted island and turn to violence. English teachers enjoy mining the book for its symbolism and its statements about human nature when it is unchained to society. John Steinbecks 1937 novel Of Mice and Men is a sparsely written tale of two mens friendship set during the Great Depression. Many students appreciate its simple, though sophisticated language, and its messages about friendship and the value of the poor.The youngest book on this list,  The Giver  by Lois Lowry was published in 1993 and was the 1994 Newbery Medal winner. It tells the story of a 12-year-old boy who lives in a seemingly ideal world but learns about the darkness within his community after receiving his life assignment as the Receiver.  Another more recent book, compared to many of the others on this list, is  The Color Purple. Written by Alice Walker and first published in 1982, this novel tells the story of Celie, a young black girl born into a life of poverty and segregation. She endures incredible challenges in life, including rape and separation from her family, but eventually meets a woman who helps Celie change her life.